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Tuesday, May 28, 2013

The Red Skelton Show: Spooky Episodes (1951 - 1971)


THE RED SKELTON SHOW: SPOOKY EPISODES 

NBC; Sursum Corporation; CBS; Van Bernard Productions; 1951-1971
Producers: Red Skelton; Cecil Barker, Jack Donohue, Douglas Whitney,
Seymour Berns, Gerald Gardner, Dee Caruso, Perry Cross
Cast: Red Skelton, David Rose and His Orchestra, Bob Lamond, Art Gilmore,
Lucille Knoch, The Alan Copeland Singers, Burgundy Street Singers,
The Jimmy Joyce SingersThe Modernaires, The Redettes, The Skelton Dancers, 
The Skeltones, Tom Hansen Dancers


Because I believe that a healthy serving of humor in your horror is good for the soul (especially when you're laughing at someone else's pain), I thought it would be wickedly delightful to SPew out a guide to spooky episodes from the long-running comedy show -- The Red Skelton Show. Nothing brings a sinister smile to this old ghoul than watching mortals terrorized by a fiendish parade of monsters and, believe it or not, this classic TV favorite from the golden age of the boob tube featured many such skits throughout its 20 year run... especially around Halloween.

The program debuted on September 30, 1951 and ran for two seasons on NBC before it was picked up by CBS in the fall of 1953. The show came full circle when, for its final season, it returned to NBC where it all began. Throughout the years The Red Skelton Show went through various changes in its format and in its cast of backup dancers and singers. Groups, such as the Burgundy Street Singers, The Redettes, or The Skelton Dancers, came and went; silent comedy skits would later appear as part of the regular program; the show experimented with color; and went from being a half-hour program to a full-hour and then back again. 


One of the few consistencies of The Red Skelton Show was the famous and well respected bandleader David Rose who's band would perform for all 20 seasons. Another common attribute was Red Skelton usually opening the show with jokes, often including his caricatures of Gertrude & Heathcliff the two seagulls, and a pantomime about an Old Man and/or a Little Boy

But it was Skelton's wonderful array of endearing characters that made viewers look forward to tuning in: Freddie the Freeloader, the lovable hobo; George Appleby, a mousy white-collar worker who suffers verbal and physical abuse from his domineering wife; Deadeye, a cowardly sheriff in the wild west who somehow always manages to "save the day"; Clem Kadiddlehopper, a dumb hick who unintentionally causes chaos wherever he goes; San Fernando Red, a shady con artist who never runs out of ideas for a new scam; and many more. In the Final Season, Skelton would introduce another recurring character, Dr. Ludwig von Humperdoo, a mad scientist out to destroy the world

Although The Red Skelton Show originally did not include many guest stars during its first two seasons at NBC, this was quickly remedied when CBS took over the program and showcased a famous celebrity or two into each of the hilarious comedy skits. Surprisingly, it would be horror icons -- such as John Carradine, Jackie Coogan, Peter Lorre, and Vincent Price -- who were among those who would quite often return as guest stars on the show. Other horror and cult favorites who have made guest appearances include George Barrows, Billy Barty, Raymond Burr, Lon Chaney Jr.Phyllis Diller, Walker Edmiston, 'Mama' Cass Elliot, Frank Gorshin, Fred Gwynne, Cedric Hardwicke, Boris KarloffJanet Leigh, Jayne Mansfield, Agnes Moorehead, Leonard Nimoy, Jack Palance, Basil Rathbone, Martha Raye, Cesar Romero, Lennie Weinrib, Mary Wickes, Jack Wild, etc., etc. Here, I have included as many spooky episodes, as well as those with a sci-fi and fantasy theme, as I have been able to unearth. Still, there are many more episodes that have not been seen by the public since they first aired, and one can only wonder what ghoulie goodies they might have contained. Enjoy!



Episode 1.15 (January 6, 1952) After his opening joke, Red Skelton goes into a skit as Painless Pitchman Pete, a mobster-crook who attempts to sell stolen domestic robots to television viewers. When Pete demonstrates how the remote-controlled mechanical man works, it goes out of control and attacks him; A short skit, called "French Hand Laundry," features a man outside a laundromat who drops a basket full of severed hands; In "Fancy Footwork," Skelton portrays Cauliflower McPugg, who is challenged to a fight by a mean boxer named Perky; The Sportsmen, a harmonizing singing quartet, guest star and perform a couple of songs. Featuring: Gil Perkins (The Reliable Robot), Charles Bronson (Perky), Ned Glass (McPugg's Manager), The Sportsmen, Lucille Knock, Bob Lamond (Announcer); Director: Martin Rackin. Teleplay: John Fenton Murray, Ben Freedman, Will Fowler, Red Skelton. NOTES: Lucille Knock was a regular on the show from 1951 - 1952 and would introduce the skits and musical numbers; Gil Perkins served as a stuntman for the show as well as Red's double. Perkins also worked as a stuntman in various horror and sci-fi movies, such as King Kong (1933), Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1941), and Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943); A very young Charles Bronson guest stars here as a rival boxer to Cauliflower McPugg, but he is credited as "Charles Buchinsky".


Episode 2.38 (June 14, 1953) The famous Billy Barty guest stars as a spaceman in a UFO skit; This episode from Season Two also includes the "Parking and Sparking" sketch and Helen O'Connell singing 'S'Wonderful' and 'I'm Getting Sentimental Over You'. Featuring: Billy Barty (Spaceman), Helen O'Connell, Bob Lamond (Announcer); Director: Martin Rackin. Teleplay: John Fenton Murray, Ben Freedman, Will Fowler, Red Skelton. NOTES: Billy Barty also appeared in many later episodes.

Episode 3.6 (October 27, 1953) This Halloween episode guest stars Lon Chaney, Jr. and features  Red Skelton as Deadeye. Featuring: Lon Chaney, Jr., Laverne & Maxene Andrews, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Hal Goodman, Larry Klein, Red Skelton. NOTES: Season Three of The Red Skelton Show was picked up by CBS after NBC dropped the program despite its popularity. The show would continue to be broadcast by CBS until April of 1970.

Episode 3.40 (June 15, 1954) Bela Lugosi, Lon Chaney, Jr., and Vampira (Maila Nurmi) guest star together in a spooky comedy skit called "Dial 'B' for Brush," while Red Skelton appears as Clem Kadiddlehopper. Featuring: Bela Lugosi, Lon Chaney, Jr., Vampira, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Hal Goodman, Larry Klein, Red Skelton.

Episode 4.18 (January 18, 1955) Red Skelton's opening stand-up routine involves jokes about how frightening Peter Lorre is; This episode's sketch begins with Peter Lorre sending threatening messages to CBS executives, insisting on being given his own comedy show and having Skelton serve as his technical adviser. Once Skelton arrives at the house of Peter Lorre, he is greeted by a wild gorilla dressed as a butler. Skelton also meets Lorre's Vampira-lookalike wife, Sam the skeleton ghost, and Lorre's group of writers: a cyclops, werewolf, and a Frankenstein monster named "Joe." With some comic coaching from Skelton, Lorre immediately launches his own TV show -- a spooky spoof on "The Honeymooners"; Also, The Redettes perform a dance number around a graveyard. Featuring: Peter Lorre, Mary Beth Hughes (Malice), Muriel Landers (Truxcie), George Barrows (Gorilla), The Redettes, Marian Carr, Mike Ross, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Jack Donohue. Teleplay: Joe Bigelow, Lou Meltzer, Red Skelton.


Episode 5.5 (October 25, 1955) Famous vaudeville comedian Ed Wynn guest stars in a skit called "Cinderfella" where he plays a Fairy Godfather for the first time; The Redettes also perform. Featuring: Ed Wynn (Fairy Godfather), The Redettes, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Ed Hiller. Teleplay: Johnny Carson, Hal Hudson, Red Skelton. NOTES: Ironically, Ed Wynn would once again play a fairy godfather in the 1960 film "Cinderfella," starring Jerry Lewis.


Episode 5.6 (November 1, 1955) It's the 1955 "Halloween Show" with a bevy of beautiful girls dressed as attractive witches with pointy hats and carrying brooms as they sing and dance; Red Skelton delivers plenty of Halloween jokes during his opening stand-up routine and demonstrates the various ways people bob for apples; Virginia Grey guest stars as Willie Lump Lump's wife and remembers how she accidentally turned Willie into an alcoholic when they first started dating -- it was on Halloween night and she fed him a box full of rum candy. Now, Mrs. Lump Lump wants to 'cure' him by reconstructing the entire bedroom to appear sideways when he wakes up. Featuring: Virginia Grey (Nancy Lump Lump), Irene Tedrow (Mrs. Hansen), Ray Kellogg (Mr. Martin), Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Ed Hiller. Teleplay: Johnny Carson, Hal Hudson, Sherwood Schwartz, Red Skelton.


Episode 5.10 (November 29, 1955) Peter Lorre returns as a guest star in a Phantom of the Opera spoof called "Phantom of the Ballet"; The Modernaires perform. Featuring: Peter Lorre (Phantom of the Ballet), Ben Hoffman, Lucille Knoch, The Modernaires, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Ed Hiller. Teleplay: Jesse Goldstein, Mort Greene, David O'Brien, Sherwood Schwartz, Red Skelton.

Episode 5.21 (February 21, 1956) The wonderfully diabolical Vincent Price guest stars as a mad scientist in the "Salesman vs. Mad Scientist" sketch. Featuring: Vincent Price (Mad Scientist), Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Jesse Goldstein, Sherwood Schwartz, Red Skelton.

Episode 6.5 (October 30, 1956) Red Skelton portrays Clem Kadiddlehopper in a skit called "The Magic Shoes". Featuring: Nancy Kulp (Witch), Sally Forrest (Ballerina), Roland Winters (Cobbler), Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Jesse Goldstein, Dave O'Brien, Sherwood Schwartz, Red Skelton.

Episode 6.8 (November 27, 1956) Red Skelton reprises his role of Cookie the Sailor once again in "The Atomic Sailor." Boris Karloff and Eva Gabor guest star. Featuring: Boris Karloff (Mad Scientist), Eva Gabor, Robert Paget, June Foray, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Jesse Goldstein, Dave O'Brien, Sherwood Schwartz, Red Skelton.

Episode 7.12 (December 24, 1957) In "The Third Wish" skit, Red Skelton plays Freddie the Freeloader who encounters a genie; The Robert Mitchell Boy Choir perform. Featuring: Richard Eyer (Genie), James Dunn (Curley), The Robert Mitchell Boy Choir, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Jesse Goldstein, Dave O'Brien, Al Schwartz, Sherwood Schwartz, Red Skelton.

Episode 7.14 (January 7, 1958) John Carradine and Lon Chaney, Jr. play mad scientists in "Appleby and the Ape". Featuring: John Carradine (Mad Scientist), Lon Chaney Jr. (Mad Scientist), Vicki Raaf (Clara Appleby), Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Jesse Goldstein, Dave O'Brien, Al Schwartz, Sherwood Schwartz, Red Skelton. NOTES: Unlike most of the episodes on CBS' The Red Skelton Show, which were aired live, this one was broadcast prerecorded due to Red Skelton's poor health issues and an unfortunate series of personal crises.

Episode 7.22 (March 11, 1958) Cedric Hardwicke plays a mad scientist in this reworking of an earlier sketch titled "Appleby and the Ape" from Episode 7.14 (January 7, 1958). Featuring: Cedric Hardwicke (Dr. Umlauf), Vicki Raaf (Clara Appleby), Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Jesse Goldstein, Dave O'Brien, Al Schwartz, Sherwood Schwartz, Red Skelton.

Episode 8.25 (April 21, 1959) Red Skelton portrays Gertrude and Heathcliff the two seagulls in his opening comedic monologue; Announcer Art Gilmore narrates Skelton's pantomime routine about a romance between two robots which goes incredibly wrong; The Skelton Dancers do a prehistoric-themed song and dance number, which features a smoke-breathing dinosaur; In "Appleby's Formula" George Appleby creates a solution to eradicate automobile pollution. Unfortunately, his wife accidentally drinks the formula and turns invisible; In his closing monologue, Skelton appears on stage as an invisible man with only his hands and derby visible. Featuring: Marilyn Maxwell (Clara Appleby), The Skelton Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Jesse Goldstein, Dave O'Brien, Sherwood Schwartz, Red Skelton.


Episode 8.27 (May 12, 1959) Red Skelton portrays Clem Kadiddlehopper in "Rapid Growth" and Peter Lorre guest stars as a mad scientist. Featuring: Peter Lorre (Mad Scientist), Peter Mamakos (Sandor), Maudie Prickett (Housewife), Olive Brasno, Jeane Wood, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Jesse Goldstein, Dave O'Brien, Sherwood Schwartz, Red Skelton.

Episode 9.3 (October 13, 1959) The Skelton Dancers open the show with a horror-themed song and dance number featuring Dracula, mad scientists, a giant spider, and female vampires; Red Skelton's stand-up routine involves jokes about using cue cards and losing his memory; The night's pantomime has Skelton playing an Old Man who invents the hot dog; In "Appleby's Bird Woman," George Appleby and his wife, Clara, go to a spook show playing a double feature: 'The Blob Strikes Back' and 'A Bucket of Blood'. Unfortunately, they are forced to leave when George becomes frightened and disrupts the movie. Exasperated by George's obsession with horror movies and books, Clara makes him believe that she has been turned into a Bird Woman. Featuring: Eve Arden (Clara Appleby), The Skelton Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Jesse Goldstein, Dave O'Brien, Sherwood Schwartz, Red Skelton. NOTES: Here are some of the lyrics to the horror musical number: "With a monster picture trend, unemployment's at an end, and the weirdos of our town are doing fine. / We can always get a job... as a spider or a Blob... or the cousin of the Son of Frankenstein. Aaahh!!!! / Beneath a pretty figure or a face... to play a screeching bat from outer space. / Gee... we... love this routine, working as horrid little creatures. / We... get... paid to be mean in all the scary double features. / Always lurking about trying to chill you until you pass out... All night. / It's terribly good for monsters in Hollywood. / Now get ready to scream...".


Episode 9.5 (November 3, 1959) Inflation and raffle tickets are the subject of Red Skelton's opening jokes; The Skelton Dancers perform a number about sailing; Amanda Blake and Guy Madison guest star in "San Fernando's Treasure Hunt." Con man San Fernando Red tries to scam treasure seekers out of their money. However, two dangerous criminals send San Fernando to the bottom of the sea where he meets the giant King Neptune guarding his treasure. Featuring: Amanda Blake (Ruby), Guy Madison (Captain), Anthony Caruso, The Skelton Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Jesse Goldstein, Dave O'Brien, Al Schwartz, Sherwood Schwartz, Red Skelton.


Episode 9.7 (November 17, 1959) In his opening monologue, Red Skelton announces that he won 'Best TV Comedian' in the 1st Annual Who's Who in Radio & Television Awards. In a random variation of topics, Skelton tells a Gertrude and Heathcliff joke; The Skelton Dancers perform a sci-fi musical number about journeying and vacationing on the moon; In "Appleby the Weatherman," the U.S. Government use George's uncannily accurate weather predictions to help launch their new super rocket. However, a devious group of men from Yugolvania kidnap him for their own purposes and hold him hostage in their castle dungeon. Featuring: Peter Lorre (Boris), Mercedes McCambridge (Clara Appleby), Frank Albertson (General Scott), Jameel Farah (Lazlo), Bob Carson (General Evans), Susan Shere (Zorina), The Skelton Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Dave O'Brien, Al Schwartz, Sherwood Schwartz, Red Skelton.


Episode 9.30 (May 24, 1960) Red Skelton opens the show with jokes about fables: The Three Bears and Aladdin's Lamp; Announcer Art Gilmore narrates as Red Skelton pantomimes an "Ugly Duckling" skit in which he transforms into the colorful bird for NBC; The Skelton Dancers perform a sci-fi musical number as spacemen on Mars; In "Clem and the Beanstalk," Clem Kadiddlehopper sells his cow for magic beans. When the beans sprout into an enormous beanstalk, Clem climbs it until he reaches a hostile civilization in outer space who plan to destroy the Earth; Rod Serling makes a Twilight Zone inspired appearance at the end of the episode. Featuring: Peter Lorre (King Zurium), Mamie Van Doren (Leona), Kathryn Card (Maw Kadiddlehopper), Jack Albertson (J.B. Throckmorton), Joe Gaudio, Gerald Harrington, Rod Serling, The Skelton Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Jesse Goldstein, Dave O'Brien, Al Schwartz, Sherwood Schwartz, Red Skelton.


Episode 10.4 (October 18, 1960) Red Skelton delivers jokes about an alien, the Devil, and the upcoming 1960 Presidential Election; Skelton pantomimes a retiring Old Man; The Skelton Dancers perform a western-themed musical number; In "Deadeye and the Magician," Vincent Price plays a villainous magician who robs everyone at a dance hall saloon and hypnotizes Sheriff Deadeye into committing a series of burglaries and thefts. Featuring: Vincent Price (Maxwell the Magician), Marie Windsor (Katie), Marshall Reed (First Marshall), Ray Kellogg (Second Marshall), The Skelton Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Dave O'Brien, Martin A. Ragaway, Al Schwartz, Red Skelton.


Episode 10.24 (May 16, 1961) Red Skelton's opening stand-up routine is a nautical theme; Skelton pantomimes an Old Man who sees his wife off on an ocean voyage; The Skelton Dancers perform a musical number in which they become stranded on a tropical island and have a great time; In "Freddie's Shipwreck," Freddie the Freeloader and his friend, Muggsy, board a cruise ship and try to pass themselves off as newlyweds. Later, they become marooned on an island and are terrorized by a wild gorilla. Featuring: Sebastian Cabot (Muggsy), Charles Cantor (Lord Wickersham), Barbara Morrison (Lady Wickersham), Frank Wilcox (The Captain), George Kennedy (The Purser), The Skelton Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Dave O'Brien, Martin A. Ragaway, Al Schwartz, Red Skelton.


Episode 11.10 (November 28, 1961) Red Skelton portrays George Appleby in another sci-fi skit called "The Great Brain Robbery." John Carradine guest stars as a mad doctor who wants to switch the brains of Appleby and a gorilla. Featuring: John Carradine (Dr. Prager), George Barrows (Gorilla), Marie Windsor (Clara Appleby), Gil Griggs (Operation Candidate), The Skelton Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Dave O'Brien, Arthur Phillips, Martin A. Ragaway, Al Schwartz, Sherwood Schwartz, Ed Simmons, Red Skelton.

Episode 11.34 (June 26, 1962) Fighting is the theme of Red Skelton's opening jokes and pantomime; Vincent Price guest stars in "Cauliflower Loses His Birds." Cauliflower McPugg's wife sends him to a shrink when he starts seeing imaginary birds everywhere. While there, he meets Mr. Gould who also suffers from the same symptoms and invites Cauliflower over to his house to meet the wife, Mrs. Gould. Unfortunately, the Goulds' home turns out to be a house of horrors with a doorbell that initiates thunder and lightning and an arm chair that tries to strangle Cauliflower. Mr. Gould introduces his wife, who seems to have misplaced her nose, and their invisible daughter. Featuring: Vincent Price (Mr. Gould), Maudie Prickett (Mrs. Gould), Emmaline Henry (Rootie McPugg), Stanley Adams (Dr. Proctor), Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Dave O'Brien, Arthur Phillips, Martin A. Ragaway, Red Skelton. NOTES: During the program, Skelton announces that The Red Skelton Show has broadcast 336 1/2 episodes in the last 11 years; Skelton also announces that, in the following week, the show will now be aired as a full hour program.


Episode 12.16 (January 15, 1963) Red Skelton plays Clem Kadiddlehopper in "Have Rickshaw, Will Travel"; Jules Munshin guest stars on "The Silent Spot" as a Mad Scientist who creates a monster; Miyoshi Umeki also guest stars and sings 'Glocca Morra'. Featuring: Jules Munshin (Mad Scientist), Miyoshi Umeki, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Dave O'Brien, Arthur Phillips, Martin A. Ragaway, Red Skelton. NOTES: By this time, the show had become a full hour program and the name was changed to The Red Skelton Hour. A New addition to the show was "The Silent Spot," which featured a different silent skit every week.

Episode 12.27 (April 9, 1963) The Skeltones and The Skelton Dancers do a musical number around a set filled with record-shaped decor; Skelton's opening comic monologue consists of jokes about the Cuban Missile Crisis, Elizabeth Taylor, and cannibals; In "The Portrait of Dorian Appleby," George Appleby tricks his unbearable wife, Clara, into posing as a wicked hag for a picture. He then sends the unflattering photograph to Playguy Magazine for a chance to win $1,000. Clara wins the contest and is named "Miss Mess America." The only problem is, how will George keep her from finding out?; Skelton delivers his closing monologue dressed as the mythological Pan. Featuring: Janet Blair (Clara Appleby), Ross Ford (Mr. Cross), Carol Byron (Girl Faun), The Skeltones, The Skelton Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Seymour Berns. Teleplay: Mort Greene, Dave O'Brien, Arthur Phillips, Martin A. Ragaway, Larry Rhine, Red Skelton.


Episode 14.6 (October 27, 1964) Guest star Martha Raye plays a gangster and sings 'Can't Buy Me Love' and 'I'll Go My Way By Myself'; "Happy Halloween" is the title of this episode's "The Silent Spot," which features Red Skelton in a haunted house. Featuring: Martha Raye (Mr. Big), Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Bill Hobin. Teleplay: Mort Greene, Dave O'Brien, Arthur Phillips, Martin A. Ragaway, Larry Rhine, Red Skelton.

Episode 14.17 (January 19, 1965) In this episode's "The Silent Spot" skit -- titled "Escaped Convict" -- Red Skelton plays a stereotype detective in pursuit of a hooded killer who leads Skelton to a spooky old house; Guest vocalist Shani Wallis sings 'I'm Old Fashioned'; The Skeltones and the Tom Hansen Dancers also perform; In "The Seven Year Wretch," an unemployed George Appleby buys a bear and turns it into a boxing attraction at a carnival. Featuring: Shirley Mitchell (Clara Appleby), Shani Wallis, Jimmy Cross, Ray Kellogg, Archie Moore, Johnny Silver, Tom Hansen Dancers; The Skeltones, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Bill Hobin. Teleplay: Mort Greene, Dave O'Brien, Arthur Phillips, Martin A. Ragaway, Larry Rhine, Red Skelton.

Episode 14.27 (March 30, 1965) Guest star Raymond Burr plays The Devil in "Appleby's Soul"; The Kinks perform 'Got Love If You Want It'; In "The Silent Spot," Red Skelton portrays a millionaire searching for hidden treasure inside a mansion. Featuring: Raymond Burr (The Devil), Shirley Mitchell (Clara Appleby), The Kinks, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Bill Hobin. Teleplay: Mort Greene, Dave O'Brien, Arthur Phillips, Martin A. Ragaway, Larry Rhine, Red Skelton.

Episode 14.28 (April 6, 1965) 'Little Red Ridding Hood' is spoofed in "The Silent Spot" segment, with Red Skelton playing the Big Bad Wolf; Patrice Munsel performs various songs; Skelton portrays Clem Kadiddlehopper in a comedy skit. Featuring: Frankie Darro (Grandma), Patrice Munsel, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Bill Hobin. Teleplay: Mort Greene, Dave O'Brien, Arthur Phillips, Martin A. Ragaway, Larry Rhine, Red Skelton.

Episode 14.31 (April 27, 1965) Fred Gwynne guest stars as Herman Munster, and Red Skelton portrays Freddie the Freeloader in "Ta-Ra-Ra-Bum-Today"; Billy J. Kramer and The Dakotas perform 'Little Children' and 'From a Window'; In "The Silent Spot," an American couple try to photograph the Eiffel Tower. Featuring: Fred Gwynne (Herman Munster), Billy J. Kramer and The Dakotas, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Bill Hobin. Teleplay: Mort Greene, Dave O'Brien, Arthur Phillips, Martin A. Ragaway, Larry Rhine, Red Skelton.


Episode 15.7 (October 26, 1965) Red Skelton and guest stars David Sharpe and Carol Byron perform a spoof of 'Hansel and Gretel' in "The Silent Spot"; Johnny Mathis sings 'On a Wonderful Day,' 'Young and Foolish,' and a ballad about Sheriff Deadeye. Featuring: David Sharpe (The Witch), Carol Byron (Gretel), Johnny Mathis (Johnny Appleworm), Tom Hansen Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Bill Hobin. Teleplay: Dave O'Brien, Arthur Phillips, Martin A. Ragaway, Larry Rhine, Red SkeltonNOTES: Beginning this season, The Red Skelton Hour would permanently convert to color.


Episode 16.9 (November 15, 1966) A Gertrude and Heathcliff joke is included in Red Skelton's monologue; In "The Silent Spot," Dorothy Neumann plays a sorcerer and Skelton is the apprentice; Guest vocalist Jane Marsh sings 'One Fine Day' and 'Speak Low'; In "Gyp Off the Old Block," Marsh and Ross Ford do a comedy skit with Skelton as San Fernando Red. Featuring: Dorothy Neumann (Sorcerer), Jane Marsh (Ruby), Tim Conway (Bill Fumble), Henry Corden, Ross Ford, Naura Hayden, Ted Mack, Sally Mills, Tom Hansen Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Bill Hobin. Teleplay: Bob Schiller, Bob Weiskopf, Red Skelton.


Episode 16.26 (March 21, 1967) In "The Silent Spot," a woman turning into a gorilla is just one of the horrors that occur in a nightmare Red Skelton can't seem to wake up from; Guest vocalist Richard Chamberlain performs 'Haven't We Met?' and 'When I Fall in Love'; In "It's a Treat to Beat a Cheat on the Mississippi Mud," Skelton portrays San Fernando Red. Featuring: Richard Chamberlain, Chanin Hale, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Bill Hobin. Teleplay: Bob Schiller, Bob Weiskopf, Red Skelton.


Episode 16.30 (April 25, 1967) Vincent Price and June Lockhart guest star in a Lost in Space spoof called "Loused in Space." Bob May reprises his TV role as The Robot; Guest vocalist Matt Monro performs 'Born Free'; In "The Silent Spot," Skelton does a 1920s sketch, titled 'The Stevedore'. Featuring: Bob May (The Robot), Vincent Price (Professor Super-Dope), June Lockhart, Matt Monro, The Alan Copeland Singers, Tom Hansen Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Bill Hobin. Teleplay: Bob Schiller, Bob Weiskopf, Red Skelton.

Episode 17.8 (October 24, 1967) In "The Silent Spot," Red Skelton finds a mermaid while searching for sunken treasure; The Singing and Dancing Ensemble join guest vocalist Michele Lee in 'I'm Old Fashioned' and 'Anything Goes'; Skelton portrays Clem Kadiddlehopper in this episode's main skit; Also, the Tom Hansen Dancers perform to 'Feelin' Groovy'. Featuring: John Forsythe, Michele Lee, Roland Winters, The Singing and Dancing Ensemble, Tom Hansen Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Bill Hobin. Teleplay: Fred S. Fox, Morte Greene, Seaman Jacobs, Dave O'Brien, Robert Orben, Arthur Phillips, Larry Rhine, Red Skelton.

Episode 17.20 (January 30, 1968) In "Fairy Tales for Old Children," Junior Cavendish the Mean Widdle Kid babysits his little brother Gregory (both played by Red Skelton) and tells him various fairy tales, which gives way to imaginary skits-within-a-skit, such as: "The Groovy Sixties" featuring Skelton as Rip Van Winkle, "Sleeping Beauty" featuring guest stars Cyril Ritchard as the Witch and Jane Powell as Sleeping Beauty, "Peter, Peter, Pumpkin Eater," "Pie-Eyed Piper," "Beauty and the Beast," and "Aladdin and His Magic Lamp"; The Alan Copeland Singers and the Tom Hansen Dancers perform to 'Three Blind Mice' and a medley from Tschaikovsky's 'Sleeping Beauty'. Featuring: Cyril Ritchard (Aladdin/Beast/Witch), Jane Powell (Mrs. Pumpkin Eater/Natasha/Sleeping Beauty), Eve Brent, David Sharpe, Brad Trumbull, Dick Winslow, The Alan Copeland Singers, Tom Hansen Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Bill Hobin. Teleplay: Fred S. Fox, Morte Greene, Seaman Jacobs, Dave O'Brien, Robert Orben, Arthur Phillips, Larry Rhine, Red SkeltonNOTES: Sidney Rushakoff designed the wonderful sets for this fantasy-themed episode.


Episode 18.1 (September 24, 1968) Guest stars Boris Karloff and Vincent Price play mad scientists in "He Who Steals My Robot Steals Trash," with Red Skelton portraying Clem Kadiddlehopper. The trio sing 'The Two of Us'; The Alan Copeland Singers and the Tom Hansen Dancers perform and guest vocalist Spanky Wilson sings 'Alfie' and 'Apartment 101'; In "The Silent Spot" skit, titled "The Nervous Wreck," Skelton plays an irritable man who is dramatically disturbed by the airplanes flying over his house. Featuring: Boris Karloff (Mad Scientist), Vincent Price (Mad Scientist), Jan Arvan (Paw Kadiddlehopper), Spanky Wilson, Ed Sullivan, James Millhollin, The Alan Copeland Singers, Tom Hansen Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Bill Hobin. Teleplay: Fred S. Fox, Morte Greene, Seaman Jacobs, Dave O'Brien, Robert Orben, Arthur Phillips, Tony Webster, Red Skelton


Episode 18.6 (October 29, 1968) In a Halloween skit on "The Silent Spot," Red Skelton plays twin brothers, one nice and one mean. The bad twin plays nasty tricks on the trick-or-treaters; The Tom Hansen Dancers perform and guest vocalists The Mills Brothers sing 'Opus One' and 'Shy Violet'; In this episode's main sketch, Skelton portrays San Fernando Red; Skelton also performs a skit involving a cop, a robber, and a suicide attempt on top of a bridge. Featuring: The Mills Brothers, George Gobel, Barbara Bostock, Bob Duggan, Beverly Powers, Tom Hansen Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Bill Hobin. Teleplay: Fred S. Fox, Morte Greene, Seaman Jacobs, Dave O'Brien, Robert Orben, Arthur Phillips, Tony Webster, Red Skelton

Episode 19.10 (November 25, 1969) Bern Hoffman and the Tom Hansen Dancers perform 'Unidentified Flying Object'; In "There's One Thing Money Won't Buy and Someday We'll Find Out What It Is," Red Skelton portrays Freddie the Freeloader; Guest vocalist Smith sings 'Baby, It's You' and 'Tell Him No'; In a skit from "The Silent Spot," called "Hunting for Wild Turkey," Skelton plays a pilgrim searching for a meal; The Jimmy Joyce Singers and the Tom perform 'Sunny'. Featuring: Walter Brennan (Walter Briarcliff, Sr.), Peggy Rea, Bern Hoffman, Smith, The Jimmy Joyce Singers, Tom Hansen Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Bill Hobin. Teleplay: George Balzer, Fred S. Fox, Morte Greene, Seaman Jacobs, Bob Mott, Dave O'Brien, Robert Orben, Arthur Phillips, Mike Settle, Red Skelton

Episode 19.12 (December 9, 1969) Agnes Moorehead guest stars in several short sketches about witches and witchcraft; Guest vocalist Shirley Bassey sings 'Be True to Your School' and performs 'We' and 'Let's Misbehave' with The Jimmy Joyce Singers and the Tom Hansen Dancers; In "He Wanted to Be a Square Shooter But He Found That His Barrel Was Round," Red Skelton portrays Sheriff Deadeye; In a skit called "Getting Rid of Mice," from "The Silent Spot," Skelton plays a man in a science laboratory attempting to find a way to rid the world of mice. Featuring: Agnes Moorehead (Bertha Bluenose), Brad Logan (Black Bart), Shirley Bassey, The Jimmy Joyce Singers, Tom Hansen Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Bill Hobin. Teleplay: George Balzer, Fred S. Fox, Morte Greene, Seaman Jacobs, Bob Mott, Dave O'Brien, Robert Orben, Arthur Phillips, Mike Settle, Red Skelton

Episode 19.25 (March 17, 1970) In a skit called "Evicting a Tenant," from "The Silent Spot," Red Skelton is frightened by a ghost when he tries to evict a spiritualist; Guest vocalist Mac Davis sings 'In the Ghetto' and 'Memories'; In "He Died with His Boots On Cause He Had Cold Feet to Start; or, He Died with His Boots Off, That's Why He Stubbed His Toe," Red Skelton portrays Clem Kadiddlehopper; The Jimmy Joyce Singers and the Tom Hansen Dancers perform 'Sing Something Simple'. Featuring: Fess Parker (Davy Crockett), Mac Davis, The Jimmy Joyce Singers, Tom Hansen Dancers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Howard A. Quinn. Teleplay: George Balzer, Fred S. Fox, Morte Greene, Seaman Jacobs, Bob Mott, Dave O'Brien, Robert Orben, Arthur Phillips, Mike Settle, Red Skelton

Episode 20.1 (September 14, 1970) Red Skelton introduces a new recurring character named Dr. Ludwig von Humperdoo who resides in a creepy castle and conducts mad experiments in a dungeon. In this skit, Humperdoo intends to destroy the world by using his red ants to carry TNT all over the country; U.S. Vice President Spiro Agnew introduces the new Red Skelton Show on NBC; In the show's opening stand-up routine, Skelton tells jokes about current television programs and does a Gertrude and Heathcliff shtick; Guest vocalist Robin Wilson sings 'For Once in My Life'; In a short skit, Skelton portrays Fairley T. Forthright, a character modeled after W.C. Fields; In a skit called "The Magic Act," from "The Silent Spot," Skelton plays a terrible magician who's bungling assistant is even worse. Jerry Lewis plays the magician's assistant, but steps out of character to express to TV audiences his heartfelt admiration for Red Skelton and his talent. Featuring: Jerry Lewis (Magician's Assistant), Jack Riley, Robin Wilson, Spiro Agnew, Mickey Manners, Carol Wayne, Burgundy Street Singers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Terry Kyne. Teleplay: Jeffrey Barron, Lionel Burt, Morte Greene, Pat McCormick, Bob Mott, Dave O'Brien, Robert Orben, Arthur Phillips, Mike Settle, Red SkeltonNOTES: After CBS cancelled The Red Skelton Hour, NBC took over the program once again and went back to calling it by its original title - The Red Skelton Show. The program also went back to a half hour format.


Episode 20.7 (October 26, 1970) It's a Halloween episode with plenty of holiday humor during Red Skelton's opening stand-up routine, which also include jokes about CBS, Zsa Zsa Gabor, Phyllis Diller, and Elizabeth Taylor; Skelton performs a pantomime about a Little Boy playing with his chemistry set and then scaring himself when he turns into the hideous Mr. Hyde; In "Hiring the Secretary," guest star Van Johnson plays a rich tycoon who turns to Freddie the Freeloader for help in hiring a new secretary; In a skit called "A Spooky Night," from "The Silent Spot," Skelton plays a scrooge who is quite mean towards the trick-or-treaters, that is until he gets repeatedly knocked out by one of the parents dressed as a female gorilla. Spooky happenings also begin to occur and a parade of monsters, which include a Triffid-like plant monster and a furry bird creature, come trampling through his house. Featuring: Van Johnson (Harry Haynes), Merv Griffin (Gorilla), Peggy Rea (Bertha), Frank Delfino, Beverly Powers, Yanos Prohaska, Bob Duggan, Burgundy Street Singers, Art Gilmore (Announcer); Director: Terry Kyne. Teleplay: Jeffrey Barron, Lionel Burt, Morte Greene, Pat McCormick, Red Skelton




OTHER EPISODES OF INTEREST:


Episode 4.25 (March 8, 1955) Red Skelton hosts the "Look Magazine Movie Awards Show", with Alfred Hitchcock winning 'Best Director'. Also appearing are Bing Crosby, Walt Disney, Judy Garland, and many others.

Episode 5.14 (January 3, 1956) John Carradine and Jackie Coogan guest star in "Old Vaudeville".

Episode 5.16 (January 17, 1956) Basil Rathbone guest stars in "The Sculpture Show".

Episode 5.19 (February 7, 1956) Cesar Romero guest stars in "The Election Show".

Episode 5.28 (April 24, 1956) John Carradine guest stars in "Robin Hood".

Episode 5.36 (June 5, 1956) John Carradine guest stars in "Pirate Show".

Episode 6.9 (December 4, 1956) John Carradine guest stars in "Clem Goes Hollywood".

Episode 6.13 (January 8, 1957) Cesar Romero guest stars in "Freddie the Count".

Episode 6.15 (January 22, 1957) Vincent Price guest stars in "Freddie, the Contest Winner".

Episode 6.21 (March 5, 1957) Peter Lorre guest stars in "Clem Strikes Oil".

Episode 6.25 (April 2, 1957) Jackie Coogan guest stars in "Romeo and Juliet".

Episode 6.31 (May 14, 1957) Vincent Price guest stars in "Clem's Inheritance".

Episode 7.4 (October 22, 1957) Cesar Romero guest stars in "Cesar Romero Hires Deadeye for TV Series".

Episode 7.5 (October 29, 1957) Jackie Coogan guest stars in "Cookie and the Satellite".

Episode 7.6 (November 5, 1957) Peter Lorre guest stars in "Appleby's Patio".

Episode 7.7 (November 12, 1957) Vincent Price guest stars in "Monsieur Clem's Fashions".

Episode 7.19 (January 14, 1958) Jackie Coogan and Peter Lorre guest star in "Appleby's Garage".

Episode 7.20 (February 25, 1958) Vincent Price guest stars in "Freddie's New Home".

Episode 7.27 (April 15, 1958) Lon Chaney, Jr. guest stars and Red Skelton portrays Bolivar Shagnasty.

Episode 7.28 (April 22, 1958) John Carradine guest stars in "The Kadiddlehopper Mural; or, Clem the Artist".

Episode 7.31 (May 13, 1958) Vincent Price and Milton Berle guest star in "Friends of Red Skelton Variety Show".

Episode 7.35 (June 24, 1958) Lon Chaney, Jr. guest stars in "Bolivar and the Lost Patrol".

Episode 8.2 (October 7, 1958) John Carradine guest stars in "Clem and the Satellite".

Episode 8.14 (January 27, 1959) Lon Chaney, Jr. guest stars as a caveman in "Appleby and the Ice Man".

Episode 8.19 (March 10, 1959) Cesar Romero guest stars in "San Fernando Loses the Dixie Queen".

Episode 8.20 (March 17, 1959) Lennie Weinrib guest stars in "Humphrey School of Dramatic Arts".

Episode 8.24 (April 14, 1959) John Carradine guest stars and Red Skelton portrays Sheriff Deadeye".

Episode 8.31 (June 23, 1959) Vincent Price guest stars in "Cauliflower Goes to Hollywood; or, Vinnie the P".

Episode 9.12 (December 29, 1959) Billy Barty guest stars in "Deadeye Turns in His Badge".

Episode 9.13 (January 5, 1960) Jackie Coogan guest stars in "Clem the Disc Jockey".

Episode 9.22 (March 15, 1960) Jackie Coogan and Vincent Price guest star in "The Original DaVinci".

Episode 9.27 (April 19, 1960) Basil Rathbone guest stars in "Super-Cauliflower".

Episode 9.29 (May 3, 1960) Cesar Romero guest stars in "San Fernando's Marriage Mill".

Episode 10.5 (October 25, 1960) Jackie Coogan guest stars in "Freddie's Manhattan".

Episode 10.7 (November 15, 1960) Red Skelton plays George Appleby in "George Appleby's Time Machine".

Episode 10.10 (December 27, 1960) Cedric Hardwicke guest stars and Red Skelton portrays Clem Kadiddlehopper.

Episode 10.18 (March 28, 1961) Cesar Romero guest stars in "Deadeye and the Alamo".

Episode 10.21 (April 25, 1961) A gorilla is featured and Red Skelton plays Clem Kadiddlehopper in "Clem the Genius".

Episode 10.28 (June 13, 1961) Jackie Coogan guest stars in "Freddie Gets Sick".

Episode 11.3 (October 10, 1961) Jackie Coogan guest stars in "Jay North Adopts Freddie the Freeloader; or, Freddie's Benefactor".

Episode 11.11 (December 5, 1961) Cedric Hardwicke guest stars in "Mr. K Goes to College".

Episode 11.13 (December 19, 1961) Red Skelton plays Freddie the Freeloader in a skit called "Freddie and the Yuletide Doll". This episode also features a spoof on the classic ballet "Spectre of the Rose".

Episode 11.16 (January 9, 1962) Jackie Coogan guest stars in "Freddie, Willing, and Able".

Episode 11.23 (March 6, 1962) John Carradine guest stars in "Appleby's Bearded Boarder".

Episode 11.28 (April 24, 1962) The Skelton Dancers do a musical number that pays tribute to The Twilight Zone. The episode is called "How to Think Up a Television Title Without Being Sued," but is sometimes referred to as "How to Fail in Business Without Really Trying".

Episode 11.33 (June 12, 1962) Jackie Coogan guest stars in "Freddie and the Daily Freeloader".

Episode 12.4 (October 16, 1962) Jackie Coogan guest stars in "The Silent Spot".

Episode 12.5 (October 23, 1962) Billy Barty guest stars in "The Silent Spot".

Episode 12.7 (November 13, 1962) Cesar Romero guest stars in "Dial P for Plumber".

Episode 12.13 (December 25, 1962) Features a spoof on the "Spectre of the Rose" ballet.

Episode 12.14 (January 1, 1963) Martha Raye guest stars in "Of Mouth and Men".

Episode 12.18 (January 29, 1963) In "The Silent Spot," Red Skelton plays Max and Maxine, a half-man/half-woman sideshow attraction.

Episode 12.20 (February 12, 1963) Cesar Romero plays a witch doctor.

Episode 12.24 (March 12, 1963) Jackie Coogan guest stars in "After the Bald Is Over".

Episode 12.32 (May 28, 1963) Episode is called "Jerk and the Beanstalk" Helen O'Connell sings 'Witchcraft'.

Episode 13.2 (October 1, 1963) Red Skelton does a Sleeping Beauty spoof in "The Silent Spot".

Episode 13.3 (October 8, 1963) Jackie Coogan guest stars in "Pop Is a Weasel".

Episode 13.6 (October 29, 1963) Billy Barty guest stars in "The Silent Spot".

Episode 13.10 (December 3, 1963) Raymond Burr guest stars.

Episode 13.11 (December 10, 1963) Martha Raye guest stars in "The Mouth Shall Rise Again".

Episode 13.12 (December 17, 1963) Jackie Coogan guest stars.

Episode 13.18 (February 4, 1964) Vincent Price guest stars in "Cast Your Brat Upon the Water".

Episode 13.23 (March 10, 1964) Jackie Coogan guest stars in "The Silent Spot".

Episode 13.27 (April 14, 1964) Vincent Price guest stars in "Oliver Twist Parody; or, The Goon and Sixpence".

Episode 13.28 (April 21, 1964) Cesar Romero guest stars in "Keep the Tramp Fires Burning".

Episode 13.30 (May 5, 1964) Jackie Coogan guest stars.

Episode 13.31 (May 12, 1964) Raymond Burr guest stars in "Disorder in the Court".

Episode 14.2 (September 29, 1964) Red Skelton plays a statue that comes to life in "The Silent Spot".

Episode 14.4 (October 13, 1964) Mary Wickes guest stars and Red Skelton plays San Fernando Red.

Episode 14.19 (February 2, 1965) Marcel Marceau and Red Skelton do a 'Pinocchio' pantomime in "A Concert in Pantomime".

Episode 14.20 (February 9, 1965) Vincent Price guest stars.

Episode 14.24 (March 9, 1965) Red Skelton reprises his Max and Maxine (half-man/half-woman) skit from Episode 12.18's "The Silent Spot".

Episode 14.25 (March 16, 1965) Jimmy Cross plays a gorilla.

Episode 14.32 (May 3, 1965) Martha Raye guest stars.

Episode 15.9 (November 9, 1965) Mary Wickes guest stars and Red Skelton plays Junior Cavendish the Mean Widdle Kid.

Episode 15.12 (November 30, 1965) Red Skelton plays a mad scientist.

Episode 15.15 (December 28, 1965) Cesar Romero guest stars.

Episode 15.19 (January 25, 1966) Vincent Price guest stars.

Episode 15.25 (March 22, 1966) Jack Palance and Phyllis Diller guest star in "Love at First Fright".

Episode 15.26 (April 5, 1966) Jackie Coogan guest stars.

Episode 16.3 (September 27, 1966) Jackie Coogan guest stars.

Episode 16.8 (November 1, 1966) Frank Gorshin guest stars in "My Fair Lady Spoof".

Episode 16.11 (November 29, 1966) Janet Leigh guest stars in "Jerk Be Nimble".

Episode 16.24 (March 7, 1967) Martha Raye guest stars.

Episode 16.25 (March 14, 1967) Cesar Romero guest stars.

Episode 17.6 (October 10, 1967) Billy Barty guest stars in "A Spy Is a Peeping Tom on Salary".

Episode 17.8 (October 31, 1967) Jackie Coogan guest stars in "The Silent Spot".

Episode 17.11 (November 14, 1967) Vincent Price guest stars.

Episode 17.12 (November 21, 1967) Billy Barty guest stars.

Episode 17.19 (January 23, 1968) Phyllis Diller guest stars in "One Minute Dramas".

Episode 17.22 (February 13, 1968) Walker Edmiston guest stars in "Sheriffs Are Bought, Not Made".

Episode 17.25 (March 5, 1968) Red Skelton and Liberace do a witch doctor skit in "One Minute Dramas".

Episode 18.4 (October 15, 1968) Martha Raye guest stars in "The Revenge of Prudence Pennyfeather; or, Wide Saddles in the Old Corral".

Episode 18.8 (November 19, 1968) Jackie Coogan guest stars.

Episode 18.10 (December 3, 1968) Jane Powell plays a fairy godmother.

Episode 18.18 (January 28, 1969) Phyllis Diller guest stars in "Beauty Is Only Skin Deep, Unless You're a Banana".

Episode 18.19 (February 4, 1969) Billy Barty guest stars and a gorilla is featured.

Episode 19.1 (September 23, 1969) Leonard Nimoy and Walker Edmiston guest star.

Episode 19.2 (September 30, 1969) Red Skelton is menaced by a wild gorilla.

Episode 19.4 (October 14, 1969) Martha Raye guest stars in "The Traveling Saleslady and the Farmer's Son".

Episode 19.9 (November 18, 1969) Walker Edmiston guest stars in "Singing Waiters, Hillbilly Songwriters".

Episode 19.11 (December 2, 1969) Janet Leigh guest stars in "It's Better to Have Loved and Lost - Much Better".

Episode 19.13 (December 16, 1969) Jack Wild guest stars as the Artful Dodger in "The Son of Oliver Twist; or, Junior Is Just a Little Dickens" Wild also performs 'Fish 'n' Chips' with the Tom Hansen Dancers.

Episode 19.15 (January 6, 1970) Vincent Price guest stars in "You Can Take the Boy Out of the Country If You Promise Not to Bring Him Back".

Episode 19.22 (February 24, 1970) Jackie Coogan guest stars in "The Three Musketeers Ride Again, Those Ding-Dong Daddies from Dumas".

Episode 19.24 (March 10, 1970) Vincent Price guest stars in "Blood Is Thicker Than Water and Harder to Shave With".

Episode 19.26 (March 24, 1970) Billy Barty guest stars.

Episode 19.28 (April 7, 1970) Cesar Romero guest stars in "Stone Walls Do Not a Prison Make, So They Added Iron Bars".

Episode 20.2 (September 21, 1970) Raymond Burr guest stars in "Freddie's Desperate Hour"; Red Skelton portrays Dr. Ludwig von Humperdoo.

Episode 20.4 (October 5, 1970) Red Skelton portrays Dr. Ludwig von Humperdoo.

Episode 20.10 (November 23, 1970) Red Skelton portrays Dr. Ludwig von Humperdoo.

Episode 20.11 (December 7, 1970) Billy Barty guest stars in "The Yacht Club".

Episode 20.15 (January 11, 1971) Red Skelton portrays Dr. Ludwig von Humperdoo.

Episode 20.19 (February 8, 1971) Vincent Price guest stars in "The Castaways".

Episode 20.20 (February 13, 1971) Martha Raye guest stars in "Appleby's Garage Sale".

Episode 20.21 (February 22, 1971) Red Skelton portrays Dr. Ludwig von Humperdoo.

Episode 20.22 (March 1, 1971) Phyllis Diller guest stars in "Sheriff Hater".


  

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